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LOCHEAD, SIGNPOST (Ref:50023)

This building is in the Dumfries And Galloway Council and the Mochrum Parish. It is a category B building and was listed on 23/11/2004.

Group Items: N/A, Group Cat: N/A, Map Ref: NX 32776 49314.

Description

Circa 1935 or 1950, with probably later arms. Painted cast-iron signpost with 4 arms. Tapered, green-painted post with ring shafts. Hoop finial inscribed SCOTTISH AUTOMOBILE CLUB in raised lettering; St Andrew's Cross in centre of hoop. White-painted cast-iron arms with black raised lettering (see Notes) and black-painted edges.

Notes

Situated at the cross roads in Lochhead, North of Elrig and Mochrum. This type of road sign, or 'fingerpost' was once ubiquitous on the roads of Scotland, and is an important part of the history of road transport. Most of these signposts have now been replaced by modern signs which are more legible to fast-moving traffic. However, other fingerposts are known to survive in Ayrshire and East Lothian. Although a number of fingerposts exist on the minor roads of Dumfries and Galloway, many of them have lost either their original post or arms or parts thereof, and very few of now survive in anything approaching their original condition. The five best surviving known examples of this type of free-standing signpost in Dumfries and Galloway have been selected for statutory listing in recognition of their attractive design, historical importance and present scarcity. The other signposts are located at Kirkland (near Moniaive), Corsock, Old Bridge of Urr, and Haugh of Urr. The design of the Corsock signpost is identical to the Haugh of Urr signpost, and they were made by the same manufacturer. The other signposts are all slightly different. There are 4 arms to the post. One is for KIRKOWAN VIA DRUMWALT 9 ½; one is for MOCHRUM 2 ½ and PORT WILLIAM 4 ½; one is for ELRIG VILLAGE 1 ¼, PORT WILLIAM 4 ½, and GLENLUCE 13 ¼; the last is for KIRKCOWAN VIA MALZIE 10 and WIGTOWN 8 ½. The arms of this post are likely to be late 20th century replacements: this part of the sign was usually cast in zinc, and would therefore not rust (unlike mild steel replacements).

References

Ayrshire Notes, No 18, Spring 2004, p16.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland. All rights reserved. Mapping information derived from Ordnance Survey digital mapping products under Licence No. 100017509 2012 . Data extracted from Scottish Ministers' Statutory List on . Listing applies equally to the whole building or structure at the address set out in bold at the top of the list entry. This includes both the exterior and the interior, whether or not they are mentioned in the 'Information Supplementary to the Statutory List'. Listed building consent is required for all internal and external works affecting the character of the building. The local planning authority is responsible for determining where listed building consent will be required and can also advise on issues of extent or "curtilage" of the listing, which may cover items remote from the main subject of the listing such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. or interior fixtures. All category C(S) listings were revised to category C on 3rd September 2012. This was a non-statutory change. All enquiries relating to proposed works to a listed building or its setting should be addressed to the local planning authority in the first instance. All other enquiries should be addressed to: Listing & Designed Landscapes Team, Historic Scotland, Room G.51, Longmore House, Salisbury Place, EDINBURGH, EH9 1SH. Tel: +44 (0)131 668 8701 / 8705. Fax: +44 (0)131 668 8765. e-mail: hs.listing@scotland.gsi.gov.uk. Web: http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/historicandlistedbuildings.

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Buildings are assigned to one of three categories according to their relative importance. All listed buildings receive equal legal protection, and protection applies equally to the interior and exterior of all listed buildings regardless of category.

ACategory A

Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type. (Approximately 8% of the total).

BCategory B

Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered. (Approximately 51% of the total).

C(S)Category C(S)

Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style, or building type, as originally constructed or moderately altered; and simple traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B. (Approximately 41% of the total).