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1 OLD EDINBURGH ROAD AT GORDON TERRACE, VIEWHILL (FORMER INVERNESS YOUTH HOSTEL), INCLUDING GATEWAYS, GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALLS (Ref:47604)

This building is in the Highland Council and the Inverness Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 16/02/2001.

Group Items: N/A, Group Cat: N/A, Map Ref: NH 6671 4489.

Description

Joseph Mitchell, circa 1835. 2-storey and basement, 5-bay villa with Jacobean detailing. Painted harled with painted margins. Raised basement; base course; chamfered reveals; strip quoins; stone finials to apex of gables to W.S (OLD EDINBURGH ROAD) ELEVATION: asymmetrical; gabled bay advanced to left, 2 windows to principal floor; flat-roofed porch to re-entrant angle to right, gableted doorway to left, tripartite openings to right infilled with vertical timber weather boarding; gableted bay to centre of 1st floor behind, window to right return; gabled bay set back to right. W (GORDON TERRACE) ELEVATION: asymmetrical; flat-roofed 20th century addition to basement floor; bipartite window to principal floor of centre bay, gableted window breaking eaves to 1st floor above; narrow bay flanking to left, single window with geometric tracery to principal floor, gabled window breaking eaves above; advanced gabled bay flanking to right, 5-light canted window to principal floor rising to rectangular-plan 5-light window at 1st floor, plaque set in gablehead; recessed bay to outer right, bipartite windows to basement and principal floors, gableted window breaking eaves to 1st floor; gabled bay to outer left, shallow rectangular-plan tripartite window with cusped tracery and leaded diamond-pane glazing to principal floor, single window to 1st floor above. N AND E ELEVATIONS: not seen 2000. Flat roofed 20th century addition in re-entrant angle. Metal fire escape stair.Predominantly 2-pane timber sash and case windows to first floor; Mixture of modern windows elsewhere.. West Highland slate roof with lead/zinc ridges. Coped skews with moulded skewputts; corbelled gablehead stacks and ridge stacks with circular and octagonal cans. Cast-iron rainwater goods. INTERIOR: not seen 2000. GATEWAYS, GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALLS: harled and coped terrace walls to S; high ashlar coped rubble walls to remainder; gabled Tudor-arched sandstone ashlar gateway to E, with hoodmould and decorative label stops, shield set in gablehead; Tudor-arched pedestrian gateway to centre of S wall with ashlar dressings; square-plan gatepiers to SW with steps leading to terrace; decorative shouldered pedestrian gateway to W wall with chamfered reveals and stone step.

Notes

The former Inverness Youth Hostel was originally built by Joseph Mitchell (1803-1883) for himself. Mitchell was a civil engineer involved in many important projects in Inverness and throughout the Highlands. He worked on Thomas Telford's transport improvements in the Highlands, he was also involved in the Caledonian Canal and was Chief Inspector and Superintendent of Highland Roads and Bridges from 1824, following the death of his farther (who held the post before him). Mitchell made a significant contribution to Inverness itself, he planned much of the first sewerage system, paved many of the streets with Caithness flags, and was also involved in the extraction of the first water supply from the River Ness. Viewhill, which was Mitchell's home after he married, is an important survival. Of particular note are the corbelled gablehead stacks, stone finials and gateways set in the boundary walls. The interior is said to include a fine ceiling bearing coats of arms.

References

H Barron, THE THIRD STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND: THE COUNTY OF LANARK, (1985), p118 and 129; J Gifford, THE BUILDINGS OF SCOTLAND: HIGHLAND AND ISLANDS, (1992), p208; INVERNESS COURIER, 4 August 2000, p8.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland. All rights reserved. Mapping information derived from Ordnance Survey digital mapping products under Licence No. 100017509 2012 . Data extracted from Scottish Ministers' Statutory List on . Listing applies equally to the whole building or structure at the address set out in bold at the top of the list entry. This includes both the exterior and the interior, whether or not they are mentioned in the 'Information Supplementary to the Statutory List'. Listed building consent is required for all internal and external works affecting the character of the building. The local planning authority is responsible for determining where listed building consent will be required and can also advise on issues of extent or "curtilage" of the listing, which may cover items remote from the main subject of the listing such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. or interior fixtures. All category C(S) listings were revised to category C on 3rd September 2012. This was a non-statutory change. All enquiries relating to proposed works to a listed building or its setting should be addressed to the local planning authority in the first instance. All other enquiries should be addressed to: Listing & Designed Landscapes Team, Historic Scotland, Room G.51, Longmore House, Salisbury Place, EDINBURGH, EH9 1SH. Tel: +44 (0)131 668 8701 / 8705. Fax: +44 (0)131 668 8765. e-mail: hs.listing@scotland.gsi.gov.uk. Web: http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/historicandlistedbuildings.

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Buildings are assigned to one of three categories according to their relative importance. All listed buildings receive equal legal protection, and protection applies equally to the interior and exterior of all listed buildings regardless of category.

ACategory A

Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type. (Approximately 8% of the total).

BCategory B

Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered. (Approximately 51% of the total).

C(S)Category C(S)

Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style, or building type, as originally constructed or moderately altered; and simple traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B. (Approximately 41% of the total).