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61 JESSIE STREET, SENTINEL WORKS (Ref:33693)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 13/05/1991.

Group Items: N/A, Group Cat: N/A, Map Ref: NS 597 625.

Description

Archibald Leitch, engineer with Brand and Lithgow, architects. Early ferro-concrete pattern store, built on the Hennebique system. Built 1903-1904 for Alley and MacLellan, engineers. 4 storeys, 12 x 3 bays; concrete panel walls, large metal-framed windows, off-centre entrance bay, wide door with 3 tall lights over added circa 1930; classical cornice, flat roof.

REAR: similar, with fire escape cantilevered out on ornate cast-iron brackets.

INTERIOR: free of columns, the load entirely carried by the externally expressed fram. Top floor has extra concrete cross pieces to accommodate shelves of pattern store.

Notes

Neglected condition (1989). The first fully reinforced concrete building havinng a ferro-concrete frame and panels, and the third oldest to survive in the UK. This building's trabeated form anticipates the American-inspired daylight factories by Albert Kahn, unlike any similar building in England. The foundry to the rear is steel framed and of lesser architectural interest. A light railway was used within the foundry. Alley and MacLellan built around 500 'knock down' ships (dismantled and reassembled on inland waters) and developed the Sentinel steam lorry, produced at their branches at Shrewsbury and Worcester. Owned form 1918-37 by Beardmores, and passed to the Weir Group in 1960.

References

Hume, 1974, I22. Patricial Cusack, "Agents of Change: Hennebique, Mouchel and Ferro-Concrete in Britain" in CONSTRUCTION HISTORY Vol 3, 1987, p 69. LG Mouchel and Partners, HENNEBIQUE FERRO-CONCRETE, THEORY AND PRACTICE (1909), p 217. Strathclyde Regional Archives 1/9992; 1/9956 (drawings approved 24.12.03)

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland. All rights reserved. Mapping information derived from Ordnance Survey digital mapping products under Licence No. 100017509 2012 . Data extracted from Scottish Ministers' Statutory List on . Listing applies equally to the whole building or structure at the address set out in bold at the top of the list entry. This includes both the exterior and the interior, whether or not they are mentioned in the 'Information Supplementary to the Statutory List'. Listed building consent is required for all internal and external works affecting the character of the building. The local planning authority is responsible for determining where listed building consent will be required and can also advise on issues of extent or "curtilage" of the listing, which may cover items remote from the main subject of the listing such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. or interior fixtures. All category C(S) listings were revised to category C on 3rd September 2012. This was a non-statutory change. All enquiries relating to proposed works to a listed building or its setting should be addressed to the local planning authority in the first instance. All other enquiries should be addressed to: Listing & Designed Landscapes Team, Historic Scotland, Room G.51, Longmore House, Salisbury Place, EDINBURGH, EH9 1SH. Tel: +44 (0)131 668 8701 / 8705. Fax: +44 (0)131 668 8765. e-mail: hs.listing@scotland.gsi.gov.uk. Web: http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/historicandlistedbuildings.

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Buildings are assigned to one of three categories according to their relative importance. All listed buildings receive equal legal protection, and protection applies equally to the interior and exterior of all listed buildings regardless of category.

ACategory A

Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type. (Approximately 8% of the total).

BCategory B

Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered. (Approximately 51% of the total).

C(S)Category C(S)

Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style, or building type, as originally constructed or moderately altered; and simple traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B. (Approximately 41% of the total).