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FOCHABERS, CASTLE STREET, GORDON CHAPEL (EPISCOPAL CHURCH) AND GORDON CHAPEL HOUSE (PARSONAGE) (Ref:1549)

This building is in the Moray Council and the Bellie Parish. It is a category A building and was listed on 24/03/1988.

Group Items: N/A, Group Cat: N/A, Map Ref: NJ 345 588.

Description

Archibald Sipson, 1832-4; additions and alterations,

Alexander Ross, 1874.

2-tier Gothic church, combining Parsonage (former school) in

ground floor and chapel in 1st floor. Orientated N-S with S

entrance gable to Castle Street. Tooled ashlar entrance

gable, harled flanks, tooled and polished ashlar dressings.

Austere S gable with round-headed entrance (simple nookshafts

and moulded reveals) in centre and triple light

pointed-headed window above linked by cill course and

continuous hoodmould; flanking square clasping buttresses

with blind slits and terminating as octagonal gablet detailed

pinnacles with stiff-leaf finials. Projecting 2-storey stair

wing at W (1874).

Triple light window in 1st floor at N gable with (1874) rose

window above. Slate roofs.

Entrance to Gordon Chapel House in W elevation; varied

glazing to windows; single storey wing at NE with piended

roof.

INTERIOR OF CHAPEL: entrance lobby with mural memorial dated

1838. Stairs (installed 1874) lead to Chapel largely

redesigned and refurnished 1874. Flat ceiling removed and

replaced by hammer-beam roof; pine dado, pews and pulpit;

brass communion rail; richly stencilled N chancel wall.

Stained glass by Morris and Co, some designed by Sir Edward

Burne-Jones; E window depicting crucifixion (and probably

dating from 1874), 2 windows on W wall and 3 in E wall

depicting variously St Cecilia (1879), St Ursula (1887),

Archangel Raphael (1902), Christ the Good Shepherd (1903) and

St Michael (1914).

Later 19th century decorative brass wall light brackets.

Grey-white oval marble font with swagged and panelled sides

supported by slender stem on plinth (possibly re-used from

elsewhere).

Notes

Ecclesiastical building in use as such. Chapel and school given by Elizabeth, wife of 5th Duke of Gordon. Mural tablet in entrance lobby commemorates Alexina Mackintosh, who died in 1838 aged 21 having been a school teacher for 4 years. Unusual 2-tier plan-form.

References

THE NEW STATISTICAL ACCOUNT xiii (1842), p 119-120. George Hay, THE ARCHITECTURE OF SCOTTISH POST-REFORMATION CHURCHES 1560-1843 (1957), pp 150, 266. Howard Colvin, A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS 1600-1840 (1978), p 737. Judith Scott, FOUR HUNDRED YEARS OF UPS AND DOWNS, THE GORDON CHAPEL FOCHABERS (1984).

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland. All rights reserved. Mapping information derived from Ordnance Survey digital mapping products under Licence No. 100017509 2012 . Data extracted from Scottish Ministers' Statutory List on . Listing applies equally to the whole building or structure at the address set out in bold at the top of the list entry. This includes both the exterior and the interior, whether or not they are mentioned in the 'Information Supplementary to the Statutory List'. Listed building consent is required for all internal and external works affecting the character of the building. The local planning authority is responsible for determining where listed building consent will be required and can also advise on issues of extent or "curtilage" of the listing, which may cover items remote from the main subject of the listing such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. or interior fixtures. All category C(S) listings were revised to category C on 3rd September 2012. This was a non-statutory change. All enquiries relating to proposed works to a listed building or its setting should be addressed to the local planning authority in the first instance. All other enquiries should be addressed to: Listing & Designed Landscapes Team, Historic Scotland, Room G.51, Longmore House, Salisbury Place, EDINBURGH, EH9 1SH. Tel: +44 (0)131 668 8701 / 8705. Fax: +44 (0)131 668 8765. e-mail: hs.listing@scotland.gsi.gov.uk. Web: http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/historicandlistedbuildings.

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Buildings are assigned to one of three categories according to their relative importance. All listed buildings receive equal legal protection, and protection applies equally to the interior and exterior of all listed buildings regardless of category.

ACategory A

Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type. (Approximately 8% of the total).

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